Gems in Israel
Spotlighting Israel's Lesser Known Tourist Attractions and Travel Sites, the Gems.

December 2001 /January 2002  
ISSN: 1527-9812  
FRONT PAGE
THIS MONTH
The Open Museum - Tefen
Archie Granot - Master Paper Cutter
Jewish Italian Heritage Lives On in Jerusalem
Rokach House
Nachalat Benyamin - Art & Craft Fair
On the Side - Tmol Shilshom & Nachalat Shiv'a
Jubilee Plaza
Dani Karavan's Kikar Levana
Dani Karavan's Kikar Levana
I have been partial to Dani Karavan’s work, since I first encountered it more than 25 years ago. Kikar Levana is an environmental sculpture that sits atop a small hill, at the Edith Wolfson Park, in Tel Aviv. Work on it began in 1977 and was completed in 1988. The sculpture’s name means White Square and perhaps alludes to the city’s nickname, the White City. It is located at the highest point in Tel Aviv, where the city meets nearby Givatayim. It is not the type of place frequented by tourists, but rather by residents of nearby neighborhoods who come to enjoy the park.

Kikar Levana is reminiscent of Dani Karavan’s earlier work, the Negev Monument in Beersheba (which should not be missed if you are in the area). Here, the artist has chosen to use white concrete. The contrast between the sculpture, the park’s greenery and the surrounding buildings, most of which are made of reinforced concrete is stark.

This sculpture spans an area of 30 x 50 meters. It features many of the elements that are familiar in Karavan’s other works, a pyramid, a water channel, a tower (with wind flutes), and a dome with an olive tree in its center.

The sculpture manages to stand out from its surroundings while blending in with the setting, which aside from its purely esthetic quality is much of its appeal.

“The site dictates the forms and the materials. The site determines and decides. The use of the forms and of the materials is the request that needs to be respected, that should not be ignored”, wrote Karavan, in Dani Karavan, Dialogue with the Environment/Resonance with the Earth.

Most of Karavan’s works are abroad. His works can be found in Italy, Germany, Spain, Switzerland and Japan, as well as other countries. His most recent works in Israel can found in Nitzana and at Yad Le’Banim in Hadera.  If you visit the Weizmann Institute of Science you can also see one his sculptures there. Probably the most visible of works (in this day and age of electronic communications), is the wall relief in stone for the Knesset’s Assembly Hall, which is made of stone from the Sea of Galilee. The work was completed in 1966. 

Kikar Levana is located at the Edith Wolfson Park in Tel Aviv. The main entrance to the park is at the intersection of Ha’ Tayasim  Ave. and LaGuardia Street. From the Givatayim side, the entry is from Ha’Shalom  Ave. The sculpture is located in a public park that is open all day.


Kikar Levana by Dani Karavan, photo reprinted with permission, Avraham Hay
Kikar Levana by Dani Karavan, photo reprinted with permission, Avraham Hay
Subscribe Now
 
For people interested in more than just the major tourist attractions. For seasoned and first-time visitors to Israel and anyone who dreams of one day visiting the holy-land.
Share Gems with a Friend
The Gems Archive

Hotels in Israel

Private Tours of Israel

Jerusalem Hotels

Tel Aviv Hotels

Eilat Hotels

Dead Sea Hotels


Eilat Hotels


Package Tours

Daily Excursions

Israel Car Rental

Bar Mitzvah Tour

Bat Mitzvah Tour

Travel and Events in Israel


Places in Israel

Subscribe

e-books



About Us

Archive

Maps of Israel

Books

Glossary

Link to Gems in Israel

Links

Tell a Friend

Recipes

Sitemap

Search

Contact

Home

Limited Edition Prints of Safed

 

 

 

 

 

 

Explore Tel Aviv's Small Museums

Published by Yael (Zisling) Adar
Copyright © 1999-2002 Yael (Zisling) Adar - Gems in Israel - www.GemsinIsrael.com. All rights reserved.
Gems in Israel, ISSN: 1527-9812,www.GemsinIsrael.com. Gems in Israel may only be redistributed in its unedited form. Written permission from the editor must be obtained to reprint or cite the information contained within this online publication.
TELL A FRIEND
EMAIL
VIEW ARCHIVE